bulldogs | football

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Nov. 22, 2014

More than 13 months since he last caught a pass in a football game, Justin Scott-Wesley’s reappearance as a playmaking wide receiver came Saturday on a first-quarter 19-yard touchdown catch in Georgia’s 55-9 win against Charleston Southern. - Full Story

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Georgia apparently came out of Saturday’s blowout of Charleston Southern without any major injuries. - Full Story

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Georgia’s offensive line turned to backups before the game was way out of hand in the second half. - Full Story

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Sean McGarity’s homecoming didn’t look that good on the scoreboard, but the Oconee County High graduate was thrilled to play in Sanford Stadium. - Full Story

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Senior Jonathon Rumph led Georgia with five catches for 67 yards and had a 12-yard touchdown catch from Brice Ramsey in the third quarter. …Georgia’s Marshall Morgan booted a season-long 53 yard field goal in the first quarter and also converted from 27 but missed from 49 …Freshman tailback Sony Michel had 21 yards on five carries after missing the Auburn game with an ankle injury. Tailback Keith Marshall (ankle) did not dress out. He appears headed for a medical redshirt season barring another injury at the position. …Freshman cornerback Malkom Parrish started his first collegiate game He had four tackles, including one for loss. …Kosta Vavlas wore No. 6 to honor injured wide receiver Michael Erdman. Vavlas had one tackle…Outside linebacker Shaun McGee wasn’t dressed out with an apparent undisclosed injury. - Full Story

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GRADING THE BULLDOGS - Full Story

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After the Bulldogs put up a 38-3 lead in the first half, Brice Ramsey showed a glimpse of how the Georgia offense will look post-Hutson Mason. - Full Story

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It was entirely fitting that the Georgia Redcoat Marching Band played the theme from “Star Wars” when Bulldogs receiver Chris Conley scored the first of his two touchdowns Saturday in a 55-9 victory over Charleston Southern at Sanford Stadium - Full Story

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Aaron Murray immediately fired off a text to his father seconds after Todd Gurley went to the ground on his final carry against Auburn with what was later proven to be a season-ending knee injury. - Full Story

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The top goal that Georgia defensive coordinator Jeremy Pruitt put on a board for his players this past week: “Get Over Ourselves.” - Full Story

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stories from |

Nov. 21, 2014

Auburn couldn’t find much room to run against Georgia, so you would think that Charleston Southern won’t either. Then again the Buccaneers lead the Big South in rushing and are 16th in the FCS at 230.5 yards per game. And Georgia still ranks ninth in the SEC in rush defense at 151.8 per game. “Their […] - Full Story

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Offense Edge: Georgia Georgia leads the SEC in scoring at 42.1 points per game and is sixth in total yards at 449.1. Quarterback Hutson Mason leads the SEC with a 67.6 completion percentage with 16 touchdowns and three interceptions and is averaging 163.8 passing yards per game, 11th in the SEC. Charleston Southern amassed 576 […] - Full Story

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1. Take care of business early There’s a big game against Georgia Tech next week. And just maybe an SEC title game the week after that. So Georgia could use a game where it takes control early and puts away its FCS opponent. That would allow backups and deep reserves to give starters some rest. […] - Full Story

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On 306 occasions in his career, Amarlo Herrera has met the ball carrier and won the battle. - Full Story

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There may not be tons of buzz for Georgia-Charleston Southern, but that doesn’t mean that Bulldog Bytes won’t get you ready for your football Saturday. Marc Weiszer and Fletcher Page of the Athens Banner-Herald hit on what became a big subject this week: the indoor football practice facility and its impact on recruiting. We turn […] - Full Story

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stories from |

Nov. 20, 2014

From Herschel Walker to current Georgia workhorse Nick Chubb, Georgia has a history of gifted running backs. And in the past four years, the stream of freshmen talent has been constant.

In 2011, Isaiah Crowell was the best freshman in the Southeastern Conference. In 2012, the tailback tandem of Todd Gurley and Keith Marshall — or “Gurshall” as the power couple became known — shined in the Georgia offense, combining for 2,144 yards. In 2014, Chubb, with the help of classmate Sony Michel, has powered Georgia to be the No. 2 rushing offense in the SEC while dealing with the absence of Gurley due to suspension and now injury.

And when it comes to recruiting, Georgia’s staff zeroes in on and attracts players with competitive mentalities, according to Bryan McClendon, running backs coach and recruiting coordinator.

“A lot of guys like the idea of competing, but when it comes down to it, the true competitors kind of rise to the occasion,” McClendon said. “It was very similar when Isaiah was still here, he was the SEC Freshman of the Year, and then Todd and Keith both came in as freshmen, and both of those guys were excited about the opportunity to just be able to compete.”

It would seem fair that a loaded depth chart could intimidate a high school senior looking to play as soon as possible at the next level. But Georgia is looking to find players to fill out the depth chart as complimentary talents instead of one-man-show rushers.

“I think the playing time question was more common when you used to see the one premier back, where he got a bunch of carries per game. Now it’s about getting guys quality carries versus quantity, keeping guys fresh, rotating backs, keeping them in situations where they can be successful and be 100 percent,” said Ben Brandenburg, recruiting operations coordinator.

McClendon said he has no doubt that young running backs deciding on the next three to four years of their athletic careers have playing time on their minds. That is the ultimate goal of the recruiting process. But with the physical nature of the position, McClendon echoed Brandenburg in the necessity of keeping players healthy, something Georgia has struggled with in recent years.

“That guy gets hit every single play, whether it be running the football, and he gets hit more than one time, whether it be blocking or pass protection. Their body isn’t really made for it,” McClendon said. “I haven’t seen a football season yet where somebody hasn’t gotten banged up in one way, shape or form.”

Between those injuries, player dismissals and one very notable suspension, the depth at the running back position has been almost as important as any name listed.

“We’ve been an example why it’s important to have more than one, or even two, or even three guys at that position that can come in and win football games for you and play good and be productive,” McClendon said.

Like most of their SEC opponents, Georgia runs a multi-back offense —  the style of offense McClendon believes football has developed to accommodate both the health of the players and the overall approach to the game.

“I think the young men nowadays understand there’s value in having depth. There’s value in not having to carry the load,” Georgia head coach Mark Richt said. “But if you’re in a system that’s going to highlight these guys’ skills, they get excited about playing."

While playing time, positional competition and skill advancement all play their roll in getting guys to don a Georgia hat come Feb. 4, 2015, McClendon knows that a guy can find those things at a number of schools. What he considers to be the key to landing a recruit won’t show up in a statistic.

“The biggest thing when it comes to recruiting is it’s about the relationships,” McClendon said. “They’ve got to trust you and feel like you are telling them the truth and you’ll be fair no matter what.”

- Full Story

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From Herschel Walker to current Georgia workhorse Nick Chubb, Georgia has a history of gifted running backs. And in the past four years, the stream of freshmen talent has been constant.

In 2011, Isaiah Crowell was the best freshman in the Southeastern Conference. In 2012, the tailback tandem of Todd Gurley and Keith Marshall — or “Gurshall” as the power couple became known — shined in the Georgia offense, combining for 2,144 yards. In 2014, Chubb, with the help of classmate Sony Michel, has powered Georgia to be the No. 2 rushing offense in the SEC while dealing with the absence of Gurley due to suspension and now injury.

And when it comes to recruiting, Georgia’s staff zeroes in on and attracts players with competitive mentalities, according to Bryan McClendon, running backs coach and recruiting coordinator.

“A lot of guys like the idea of competing, but when it comes down to it, the true competitors kind of rise to the occasion,” McClendon said. “It was very similar when Isaiah was still here, he was the SEC Freshman of the Year, and then Todd and Keith both came in as freshmen, and both of those guys were excited about the opportunity to just be able to compete.”

It would seem fair that a loaded depth chart could intimidate a high school senior looking to play as soon as possible at the next level. But Georgia is looking to find players to fill out the depth chart as complimentary talents instead of one-man-show rushers.

“I think the playing time question was more common when you used to see the one premier back, where he got a bunch of carries per game. Now it’s about getting guys quality carries versus quantity, keeping guys fresh, rotating backs, keeping them in situations where they can be successful and be 100 percent,” said Ben Brandenburg, recruiting operations coordinator.

McClendon said he has no doubt that young running backs deciding on the next three to four years of their athletic careers have playing time on their minds. That is the ultimate goal of the recruiting process. But with the physical nature of the position, McClendon echoed Brandenburg in the necessity of keeping players healthy, something Georgia has struggled with in recent years.

“That guy gets hit every single play, whether it be running the football, and he gets hit more than one time, whether it be blocking or pass protection. Their body isn’t really made for it,” McClendon said. “I haven’t seen a football season yet where somebody hasn’t gotten banged up in one way, shape or form.”

Between those injuries, player dismissals and one very notable suspension, the depth at the running back position has been almost as important as any name listed.

“We’ve been an example why it’s important to have more than one, or even two, or even three guys at that position that can come in and win football games for you and play good and be productive,” McClendon said.

Like most of their SEC opponents, Georgia runs a multi-back offense —  the style of offense McClendon believes football has developed to accommodate both the health of the players and the overall approach to the game.

“I think the young men nowadays understand there’s value in having depth. There’s value in not having to carry the load,” Georgia head coach Mark Richt said. “But if you’re in a system that’s going to highlight these guys’ skills, they get excited about playing."

While playing time, positional competition and skill advancement all play their roll in getting guys to don a Georgia hat come Feb. 4, 2015, McClendon knows that a guy can find those things at a number of schools. What he considers to be the key to landing a recruit won’t show up in a statistic.

“The biggest thing when it comes to recruiting is it’s about the relationships,” McClendon said. “They’ve got to trust you and feel like you are telling them the truth and you’ll be fair no matter what.”

- Full Story

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ATLANTA ‑ An Augusta-area state lawmaker is sponsoring House Bill 3 to impose what he calls a hefty fine on anyone jeopardizing the eligibility of a student athlete such as the sports-memorabilia broker who paid University of Georgia running back Todd Gurley for his autograph. - Full Story

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ATLANTA ‑ An Augusta-area state lawmaker is sponsoring House Bill 3 to impose what he calls a hefty fine on anyone jeopardizing the eligibility of a student athlete such as the sports-memorabilia broker who paid University of Georgia running back Todd Gurley for his autograph. - Full Story

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stories from |

Nov. 19, 2014

Georgia coach Mark Richt is among 20 semifinalists named Wednesday to the Maxwell Football Club Collegiate Coach of the Year. Alabama’s Nick Saban, Ole Miss’ Hugh Freeze and Mississippi State’s Dan Mullen are the others from the SEC. Richt was also named coach of the week by the Bobby Dodd Coach of the Year Foundation and the Peach Bowl. …Cornerback Damian Swann did not practice due to “flu-like symptoms,” Richt said. …Brendan Langley, who started at cornerback against Missouri but has not played in the last two games, worked as a scout-team receiver Wednesday. That’s the same position he played after moving from the secondary after spring practice. “I’m not sure if he’s getting defensive reps right now or not,” Richt said. “You’ve got to help where needed sometimes.” …The latest bowl projections from ESPN’s Brett McMurphy and Mark Schlabach put Georgia in the Peach Bowl against a familiar bowl opponent: Michigan State. Georgia played the Spartans in the Outback Bowl to end the 2011 season and in the Capital One Bowl to finish the 2008 season. ...Country music star Lee Greenwood will perform the National Anthem and at halftime Saturday with the Redcoat Band. - Full Story

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Georgia had an atypical game with several dropped passes against Auburn, but the threat of throwing the ball downfield paid off, coordinator Mike Bobo said. - Full Story

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Georgia coach Mark Richt was asked earlier in the week about maybe sitting out tailback Nick Chubb against Charleston Southern to make sure the tailback position doesn’t get further depleted. - Full Story

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After averaging 30 carries per game during a three-game stretch, Nick Chubb has carried the ball 13 and 19 times the last two games. - Full Story

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Coach Mark Richt smiled Wednesday when he was asked about whether he heard defensive coordinator Jeremy Pruitt’s comments a day earlier that caused a bit of a stir. Pruitt said that this would be the last Georgia team that wouldn’t have an indoor practice facility. - Full Story

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WATKINSVILLE | Oconee County swimmer Annie Williamson has spent much of her swim career in the Gabrielsen Natatorium with her club team at Athens Bulldog Swim Club. - Full Story

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